How to Recover From Burnout By Rebalancing Your Life


By Dr. Mercola Burnout is becoming a more common problem in the United States and around the world. How can you avoid it or recover from it if you’ve already hit the proverbial wall? Dr. Joseph Maroon, a professor of neurosurgery at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, has written a book that addresses these very questions. “Square One: A Simple Guide to a Balanced Life” grew out of his own struggles with burnout, setbacks and depression after he’d become a world-class neurosurgeon before the age of 40. “I’ve had rather impressive success [and] cataclysmic failure personally,” Maroon says. “I was intent on becoming the very best that I could in terms of my profession, neurosurgery. I worked extremely diligently. It became an all-encompassing pursuit for me in my life … with success, societal approval, writing papers, going to national meetings … Soon after becoming chief of neurosurgery at a major university hospital, I [crac
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/06/18/how-to-recover-from-burnout.aspx

Diabetes Taking a Higher Toll on Life Than Suspected


By Dr. Mercola In a time when information travels at the speed of the internet, there continues to be a staggering amount of misinformation shared about type 2 diabetes. The distortion of the truth contributes to the growing epidemic across the world, with estimates that 422 million have been diagnosed with diabetes.1 Just as overwhelming are the numbers of people who suffer from prediabetes, a condition where your blood sugar is higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes. An estimated 38 percent of Americans have prediabetes2 and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 90 percent of them don’t know they have it. Unfortunately, even your own physician may share outdated information with you that won’t help to stabilize or reverse the condition. Despite the growing prevalence of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), the fact is that type 2 diabetes is completely preventable with a few simple, inexpensive lifestyle adjustments. Impaired
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/04/19/diabetes-deaths.aspx

Eat This, Not That for Longer Life


By Dr. Mercola You’ve probably heard that “eating right” can go a long way toward keeping you healthy, while it stands to reason that if you don’t, just the opposite will happen — at least sooner than it might have otherwise. It turns out this is more than just conjecture, since a new study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), reports that if you eat the right foods in the right amounts, your risk of dying from heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes — among the most common killers in the U.S. — could be cut nearly in half. That’s pretty impressive, but what does “eat the right foods” even mean? It turns out there’s a “substantial body of evidence” showing that “suboptimal” diets are undeniably culpable in causing the development of these illnesses, collectively known as cardiometabolic diseases (CMD), for several reasons. Specifically: “Dietary factors studied have included individual nutrients (macronutrients, micronutrients, minerals, vitami
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/03/20/eating-the-right-foods.aspx

How to Save a Life


By Dr. Mercola Everyone is capable of learning how to do cardiopulmonary necessitation (CPR), but according to the American Heart Association, 70 percent of people living in the U.S. feel helpless during an emergency.1 This is alarming as 88 percent of all cardiac arrests happen at home, meaning the person you save may be someone you love. For the first time in 50 years, the American Heart Association released a snapshot of heart disease and stroke statistics that indicate those who are treated only by medical personnel after a heart attack at home, had a 10.6 percent survival rate, while those who received bystander CPR had a 31.4 percent survival.2 However, CPR is not only useful in the event of a heart attack. The concepts can be used to save a life following an accident or injury as well. If bystander CPR is not performed, the survival rate drops by 7 percent every minute.3 If it takes 10 minutes for emergency personnel to attend to a cardiac arrest casualty, without bystander CPR
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/03/18/cpr-may-save-lives.aspx

Is Modern Life Killing Your Sense of Smell?


By Dr. Mercola Olfactory evolution — there’s a term you’re not likely familiar with, but it’s the line of expertise one doctor has pursued to sniff out the reasons why some peoples’ sense of smell has diminished, overall, in the last few decades or so. Kara Hoover, Ph.D., a specialist in this field, says pollution and other environmental factors of this modern age are ruining mankind’s ability to smell. It’s worse for some, depending on where they live.1 One of the things this has led to, Hoover says, is that people with weak olfactory abilities can no longer detect the more subtle nuances of food fragrances. For them, flavors are less distinct, which makes them crave foods with stronger, more pronounced flavors, such as salty and sweet tastes. “Taste is three-fourths smell,” some used to say. Hoover’s hypothesis, which she presented in Boston at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), suggests that people with a reduced sense of smell are more l
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/03/11/pollution-environmental-factors-ruining-sense-of-smell.aspx