Cherries — A Potent Super Food


By Dr. Mercola Cherries are a favorite summer treat with a number of health benefits. Harvest season runs from May through July, and with high susceptibility to disease and a short shelf life, cherry season is a short one. An exception is if you grow your own Barbados or West Indian cherry, more commonly known as the acerola cherry. I have several acerola trees and harvest cherries nearly nine months of the year. Acerola cherries1 also are one of the highest sources of vitamin C. Each acerola cherry provides about 80 milligrams (mg) of natural vitamin C with all the other important supporting micronutrients, unlike synthetic vitamin C. When I have a bountiful harvest and eat more than 100 cherries, I get close to 10 grams of vitamin C. The recommended daily allowance for vitamin C in the U.S. is a mere 75 to 90 mg for women and men respectively, so just one of these cherries can provide you with all the vitamin C you need for the day. You pretty much have to grow acerola cherries on y
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/06/19/cherries-super-food.aspx

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Schisandra: China’s Most Potent Medicinal Berry


By Dr. Mercola While it may sound like a fantasy planet or a new prescription drug, schisandra is neither, but may end up affecting the reliance some have on the latter. That’s because schisandra, a berry that grows on woody, climbing vines in the cool subtropical forests of China’s Upper Yangtze region and parts of Russia, is now a bona fide superfood. Known as a traditional curative for chronic coughs, incontinence, night sweats and insomnia for 2,000 years, the berry is gaining new attention. Modern-day restaurants in China offer alcohol with a base of saturated schisandra (Schisandra chinensis) berries, which patrons top up from tall glass containers, like lemonade at an American picnic. But the flavor is not for the faint of heart. Amazingly, schisandra berries (sometimes spelled with a “z”) feature all five of the taste senses at once, each denoting its own medicinal application, which experts at Learning Herbs1 say can be determined by the flavor: Sweet — Sweet herbs,
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/05/08/schisandra-berry.aspx